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Thursday, February 22, 2018

I recently posted the below on the SANS Internet Storm Center.

The Center for Internet Security (CIS) has been working diligently to update the CIS Controls (formerly known as the Critical Security Controls). A compelling feature of the CIS Controls is their regular updates that reflect the current cyber threats that face organizations, both small and large. The CIS Controls are the product of a truly global collaboration effort. “The CIS Controls have always been the product of a global community of adopters, vendors, and supporters, and V7 will be no exception,” said Tony Sager, CIS Senior Vice President and Chief Evangelist for the CIS Controls.

CIS is providing an opportunity to participate in the CIS Controls Version 7 release event that takes place March 19 in Washington, D.C., with options to either attend in-person or remotely via live stream. If you have not yet applied the CIS Controls in your environment, the release event can serve as the catalyst you need to consider them as an integral part of your cyber roadmap!

Russell Eubanks
ISC Handler
SANS Instructor


Saturday, October 7, 2017

CIS Controls Implementation Guide for Small-and Medium-Sized Enterprises

I recently posted the 
below on the SANS Internet Storm Center.

Recently the Center for Internet Security (CIS) released the CIS Controls Implementation Guide for Small-and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs). The Implementation Guide is directly mapped to the CIS Critical Security Controls and is focused on actionable steps that can be taken right now to assess and improve the cyber security posture and preparedness, particularly in small and medium sized enterprises. Recently a webinar with some of the team members who helped develop the Implementation Guide was made recorded.  

The guide focuses on 3 key areas of
  • Know your environment
  • Protect your assets
  • Prepare your organization

I especially like the questions that are provided in the Implementation Guide
  • Do you know what is connected to your computers and networks?
  • Do you know what software is running on your systems and networks?
  • Do you set up your computers with security in mind?
  • Do you manage who has access to sensitive information or who has extra privileges?
  • Is your staff clear about their role in protecting your organization from cyber incidents?

When reviewing these questions, especially for the first time, you may not like your answers very much. I encourage you to use your answers as as motivation to apply focused attention to achieve better answers over the next 30 days. No matter the size of your enterprise, I believe there is something in the Implementation Guide for you!

Russell Eubanks

Friday, September 22, 2017

What is the State of Your Union?

What if you as an information security leader held an information security State of the Union address with the explicit purpose of educating both your leaders and business partners on your information security program and the areas of focus for the next year? Communicating to those who are not in our area is certainly a challenge; however, the benefits outweigh the effort in several different ways.

By being intentional at sharing the state of your security union, you can not only deliver the status of your program but also equip your leaders with information they can quite literally share in environments that your team is not able to attend.  

What should you consider including?
* Effectiveness of your program
* Opportunities to improve your program
* Communicate recent achievements
* Demonstrate stewardship of your resources
* Show how your team supported objectives of your organization
* Possible actions that you want others to take
* Clear call to action to the leaders to increase support, funding, and staffing
* Opportunity to receive feedback

How are you communicating the State of Your Security Union? Please leave what works in our comments section below.

Russell Eubanks

Saturday, June 10, 2017

An Occasional Look in the Rear View Mirror

I recently posted the 
below on the SANS Internet Storm Center.

With two new drivers in my home, I am training them to occasionally look in the rear view mirror of their car as an effective way to increase their situational awareness when driving. What if this principle were applied to the area of hardware and software inventory? Perhaps in the form of a quarterly reminder to consider CIS Critical Security Controls 1 and 2 that called for an objective look at hardware and software that might not be as shiny and new. Intentionally searching for this type of deferred maintenance could very well find unnecessary risk that is imposed on the entire organization.

Some organizations have an interesting approach - for every new tool purchased, two tools must also be retired. What a novel section to include in the business justification for the next new tool. Take a look in the rear view mirror every once in a while - particularly at the area of technology retirement to make sure you don't just continue to increase the collection of tools. Who knows what might be discovered.

What grade would you give yourself in the discipline of technology retirement? Please leave what works for you in our comments section below.

Russell Eubanks